Alaska

Alaska in September

September weather & where to go

Similar to May, September is thought to be a shoulder month in Alaska, so weather and wildlife can be a bit unpredictable. However, September can still be a great month for viewing bears, and we always say that the key to travel in Alaska is to be prepared for all types of weather. That way it won’t affect your mood or experience.

Most outdoor activities can still be enjoyed in September, and often the colours of autumn (or fall) are nothing short of spectacular.

Towards the end of August, and leading into September, the weather patterns change, bringing clouds, and cooler weather. This signals to the trees it’s time to turn, and the leaves turn impressively rich reds. In the Kenai Peninsula you can still embark on fishing tours, as the rivers still bubble away with salmon. Then in Katmai National Park and on Kodiak Island, bears still fish from the river banks, swiping with talons larger than a human finger. Most of our Alaska grizzly bear safaris can still be enjoyed in September, and wildlife sightings are usually very impressive.

In Denali National Park, further north, the average temperature significantly drops to about 7 degrees Celsius during the day, and rainfall increases to about 64mm for the month. You can still embark on most activities here until mid-September, from wild walks, to biking, fishing and flight seeing.

For something truly remote and wild, head to Wrangell St Elias National Park, where a stay at Ultima Thule Lodge will ensure you explore places previously untouched by man. Enjoy lunch on an ancient glacier, watch wildlife from grizzlies to ground squirrels, and even kayak through vast flowing rivers. This is a truly wild park, open year round, but you should not travel here independently due to the limited search and rescue options.

September is the last month of the year that we would recommend travelling to Alaska for a grizzly bear safari. After this, the weather gets colder, and the days shorter. The last of the salmon have made their journey upriver, and many animals will go into hibernation for the long winter ahead.

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