World Rhino Day: Why You Should See Rhinos in the Wild Now

Hannah Champion

22 Sep 2015

Happy World Rhino Day!

Rhinos are among the most endangered creatures in the world with the northern white rhino subspecies only remaining in existence thanks to its protected environment. It is devastating to think we may have seen the last ever image of a northern white rhino calf, when Fatu was born in captivity in 2000. As the only remaining male northern white rhinos are related to her, she will not be able to safely reproduce.

So what can you do to protect the other species of rhino that still have a chance? Go and visit them in the wild with a sustainable tour operator! 

Taking part in sustainable safaris is not only a fantastic experience but it also puts money directly into the parks and reserves that are striving to protect these endangered animals.

Conservationists and anti-poaching teams worldwide are working tirelessly to save these creatures, from dehorning them as a preventative measure against poaching attacks, to protecting habitats and educating locals.

Conservationists and anti-poaching teams worldwide are working tirelessly to save these creatures, from dehorning them as a preventative measure against poaching attacks, to protecting habitats and educating locals.

A good news story in the rhino world was the recent arrival of a new calf to one of the rhinos moved from South Africa to Botswana by Rhinos Without Borders earlier this year. We hope to hear many more success stories like this over the coming months and years.

Thankfully, black rhinos have seen a population increase in the last two decades due to tenacious conservation work but this is unfortunately not the case for the other four species. You can see both black and white rhino in a number of game reserves across southern and eastern Africa but the Javan and Sumatran rhino are rarely seen in the wild as they are so close to extinction.  

It is vital that we stand together against poaching and destroy the myths that rhino horns can be used as medicinal cures or kept as status symbols. These horns are, in fact, just made up of keratin - the same protein as in human hair and nails. So why on earth has so much value been placed on these precious rhino horns, so much so that these animals are being brutally mutilated in order to sell the horns on the black market?

Give back to rhino conservation by taking a sustainable safari to Africa please get in touch and one of our destination specialists will be able to help plan your trip of a lifetime.

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